The traditional Korean hats, somewhere between a Zorro hat and a pilgrim hat, were popular during the Joseon Dynasty, primarily to protect against the sun, but also to symbolise the wearer’s place in the hierarchy system.

The traditional Korean hats, somewhere between a Zorro hat and a pilgrim hat, were popular during the Joseon Dynasty, primarily to protect against the sun, but also to symbolise the wearer’s place in the hierarchy system.

1900's Kisaeng

1900's Kisaeng

THE FLYING SEE-SAW GIRLS OF KOREA -- Go Ahead....Try This at Home ! by Okinawa Soba, via Flickr

THE FLYING SEE-SAW GIRLS OF KOREA -- Go Ahead....Try This at Home ! by Okinawa Soba, via Flickr

korea hanbok lower class clothing

korea hanbok lower class clothing

Vintage photo--Korea

Vintage photo--Korea

Let’s just say, during the Joseon Dynasty, you level of “cool” definitely depended on how well you wore a hat.

Let’s just say, during the Joseon Dynasty, you level of “cool” definitely depended on how well you wore a hat.

305 "Rice-jellysellers" Early colonial period postcard. National Anthropological Archive, Smithsonian

305 "Rice-jellysellers" Early colonial period postcard. National Anthropological Archive, Smithsonian

A street vendor sells goods on a busy Pyongyang sidewalk.

A street vendor sells goods on a busy Pyongyang sidewalk.

Young palace gisaeng in Seoul, Korea. c. 1910-1920 . This girl is a palace gisaeng, the Korean equivalent of Japan's geisha. The photo is dated to 1910-1920; it's not clear whether it was taken at the very end of the Korean Imperial era, or after the Empire was abolished.  Although technically members of the slave class in society, palace gisaeng probably had a very comfortable life. On the other hand, I would not want to wear that hair pin - imagine the neck strain!

Young palace gisaeng in Seoul, Korea. c. 1910-1920 . This girl is a palace gisaeng, the Korean equivalent of Japan's geisha. The photo is dated to 1910-1920; it's not clear whether it was taken at the very end of the Korean Imperial era, or after the Empire was abolished. Although technically members of the slave class in society, palace gisaeng probably had a very comfortable life. On the other hand, I would not want to wear that hair pin - imagine the neck strain!

"Vender of Candy or Sweetmeats" ca. 1878 Natl Anthropological Archives SIRIS

"Vender of Candy or Sweetmeats" ca. 1878 Natl Anthropological Archives SIRIS

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