Posters for Japan

A collection of posters about the 2011 Tohoku Earthquake.
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Mica Knibbs

Mica Knibbs

Source: Lucas Krull. The red sun symbol of Japan is losing cohesion. Looking as if the red ink was doused with water, it is a powerful metaphor for the suffering and shock in the aftermath of the natural and man-made disaster.

Source: Lucas Krull. The red sun symbol of Japan is losing cohesion. Looking as if the red ink was doused with water, it is a powerful metaphor for the suffering and shock in the aftermath of the natural and man-made disaster.

Source: Steven Jodistiro - "Donate". The run sun symbol here is used to solicit donations and funds for the rebuilding of Japan, very cleverly keeping in theme and getting the message across.

Source: Steven Jodistiro - "Donate". The run sun symbol here is used to solicit donations and funds for the rebuilding of Japan, very cleverly keeping in theme and getting the message across.

The sun is half-drowned in water, in reference to the tsunami. Very simple, but very easily understood.

The sun is half-drowned in water, in reference to the tsunami. Very simple, but very easily understood.

Source:Japan is broken by Henry Moran. Simple but very expressive. The word "Japan" is split in two, an effective use of typography as a symbol and message.

Source:Japan is broken by Henry Moran. Simple but very expressive. The word "Japan" is split in two, an effective use of typography as a symbol and message.

Source: Evan Stremke. Two well-known symbols are combined: the red sun and the white "plus sign" cross, the western symbol for aid and charity. In a way it also refers (for me) the coming together of east and west in the aftermath of the tragedy.

Source: Evan Stremke. Two well-known symbols are combined: the red sun and the white "plus sign" cross, the western symbol for aid and charity. In a way it also refers (for me) the coming together of east and west in the aftermath of the tragedy.

Source: Project Senbazuru by Jessica Moon. Several well-known Japanese symbols are represented: the red sun, the paper cranes, and the wave, which could either be from Hokusai's "The Great Wave off Kanagawa" or the tsunami. The cranes are symbol of hope, and thereby the tsunami, though a destructive force, is redeemed and transformed, or rebuffed by the thousand cranes ("senbazuru") as it crashes against the red sun.

Source: Project Senbazuru by Jessica Moon. Several well-known Japanese symbols are represented: the red sun, the paper cranes, and the wave, which could either be from Hokusai's "The Great Wave off Kanagawa" or the tsunami. The cranes are symbol of hope, and thereby the tsunami, though a destructive force, is redeemed and transformed, or rebuffed by the thousand cranes ("senbazuru") as it crashes against the red sun.

Source: Alex Liebold. Something a little different, the tear in the sun, which is the geographically outline of Japan, is being mended, both a metaphor for the damage and the reconstruction work underway.

Source: Alex Liebold. Something a little different, the tear in the sun, which is the geographically outline of Japan, is being mended, both a metaphor for the damage and the reconstruction work underway.

The use of origami schematics as a typography to spell out the word "help" is very effective and simple. I actually find that maybe the graphic of the crane in the white circle to a little superfluous, but perhaps without it, it might not be clear what this is about.

The use of origami schematics as a typography to spell out the word "help" is very effective and simple. I actually find that maybe the graphic of the crane in the white circle to a little superfluous, but perhaps without it, it might not be clear what this is about.

Becoming a Richter scale graphic, it alludes to the earthquake, and it forms the outline of the red sun symbol.

Becoming a Richter scale graphic, it alludes to the earthquake, and it forms the outline of the red sun symbol.

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