Empowerment

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a quote that reads standing up for yourself doesn't make you argumentative sharing your feelings
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Stand Up For Yourself #bullies, #bullying, #nomorebullying, #stopbullying, #respect, #boundaries, #truth, #facts
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Always Believe in Yourself - Tiny Buddha
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New Research Shows How to Facilitate Social Courage
New Research Shows How to Facilitate Social Courage : The news headlines these days arefilled with stories of courage and stories of absence of courage. Courage seems to be what the times are calling for. For example the #metoo campaign has provided a new forum to help women have the courage to come forward and report sexual abuse. But what exactly is courage and who is most likely to be courageous? Might the way we think about the situation make a difference or are situational and personality factors more powerful? A recent study published online this month in the Journal of Positive Psychology explored the predictors of day to day courage in the workplace. What is courage? According to Rate and colleagues (2007; Rate 2010) courage is a (a) willful intentional act (b) executed after mindful deliberation (c) involving objective substantial risk to the actor (d) primarily motivated to bring about a noble good or worthy end (Rate et al. 2007 p. 95). This definition emphasizes taking action after mindful thought rather than impulsively rushing in. This view of courage emphasizes consciously chosen behavior taken at some personal risk because of core values or the desire to bring about a positive outcome rather than automatic impulsive behavior that may not be consciously chosen. The researchers in this study focused primarily on behavioral social courage which was assessed by the Howard and colleagues (2016) 11-item Workplace Social Courage Scale (WSCS). This type of courage involves taking deliberate action or speaking up in ways that create risk for the persons social image. The worker takes this action for the sake of others or of helping the organization. An example of this type of courage is speaking up when a co-worker is rude to somebody even at personal cost. What are the predictors of social courage? In two different studies the researchers looked at several different factors that might predict courage including personality traits (grit and proactive personality) job characteristics (e.g. complexity autonomy or social support) and demographic factors like age and sex. The first study surveyed more than 200 workers and found that the personality factors of grit and proactive personality were predictive of greater social courage after controlling statistically for the other factors. Gritty people are determined passionate about their goals and willing to persevere. Proactive people take action to address and fix problems rather than avoiding. In the second study of more than 200 workers various leadership styles (e.g. empowering leadership abusive leadership) and cultural influences (e.g. power distance humane orientation) were assessed as predictors along with age tenure with the organization and gender. In this study empowering leadership age and power distance were all predictive of social courage but gender and other cultural influences and leadership styles were not. Empowering leadership involves providing guidance and autonomy and making decisions collaboratively. Power distance is the extent to which rank and position in the hierarchy conveyed special privileges. These findings suggested that leaders who empower their workers and less hierarchical organizations enabled workers to act more courageously. The researchers then conducted a third study of 395 workers in which all of the variables in the two previous studies were included as predictors along with an assessment of the perceived benefits and risks of behavioral social courage. In this study age and proactive personality were the strongest predictors of courage. Social courage is more related to fixed factors like age and tendency to be proactive than to aspects of the work environment or workers beliefs about the consequences of speaking up. Implications This studys findings suggest that courage is mostly an internal quality of a person although workplace environment and leadership may have a role in empowering people to speak or act courageously. This study is limited by the fact that all variables were assessed by self-reported questionnaires rather than by observing the workers behavior in actual situations. Research about courage is still relatively new and emerging. One implication of this study is the importance of encouraging our children to have a voice and teaching them how to take action to help themselves and fix problems so they can develop more proactive personalities and therefore feel more empowered to act courageously as adults. Also older people can play an important role as courageous role models for their younger colleagues. Organizations and society can benefit when people act courageously.
a painting with the words at the end of the day, remind yourself that you did the best you could today and that is good enough
You Did the Best You Could - Tiny Buddha
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8 Empowering Ways to Stop Feeling Guilty - Psychology Today by Melanie Greenberg Ph.D. Author of The Stress-Proof Brain - How to ditch that guilt for good! Missing Work, Essential Oils For Headaches, End Of Year Activities, Starting Keto, Headache Relief, Teacher Organization, Brain Fog, Curriculum Vitae, Homeschool Mom
8 Empowering Ways to Stop Feeling Guilty
8 Empowering Ways to Stop Feeling Guilty - Psychology Today by Melanie Greenberg Ph.D. Author of The Stress-Proof Brain - How to ditch that guilt for good!
8 Empowering Ways to Stop Feeling Guilty - Psychology Today by Melanie Greenberg Ph.D. Author of The Stress-Proof Brain - How to ditch that guilt for good!
8 Empowering Ways to Stop Feeling Guilty
8 Empowering Ways to Stop Feeling Guilty - Psychology Today by Melanie Greenberg Ph.D. Author of The Stress-Proof Brain - How to ditch that guilt for good!
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Five Secrets to a Stress-Proof Brain
Five Secrets to a Stress-Proof Brain. New blog post on Psychology Today's Most Read List. How to master stress rather than try to avoid it #stress #motivation #inspiration
NEW 2day: 3 Kinds of Insecurity and How to Handle Them.  Psychology Today Home Remedies, Life Coaching, Coaching, Zinc Deficiency, Calendula Benefits, When Youre Feeling Down, Feeling Insecure, Cosmopolitan, Disease
The 3 Most Common Causes of Insecurity and How to Beat Them
NEW 2day: 3 Kinds of Insecurity and How to Handle Them. Psychology Today
Six Ways to Tell if you're Dating a Narcissist - New on #Psychology Today Narcissistic Men, Lack Of Empathy, Narcissistic People, Narcissistic Behavior, Sigmund Freud, Co Parenting, Personality Disorder, Mens Health
6 Ways to Tell if You’re Dating a Narcissist
Six Ways to Tell if you're Dating a Narcissist - New on #Psychology Today
Promote what you love :-) Wild Women Sisterhood, Today Quotes, Social Movement, Wild Woman, New People, Thoughts Quotes
Promote what you love :-)
Thirty Reasons You Get Criticized and Best Ways to Handle It | Psychology Today Personal Development, Success Advice, Accountability Partner, Straight Guys, 5 Ways, Personal Growth, Self Help
The 30 Most Common Reasons People Might Criticize You
Thirty Reasons You Get Criticized and Best Ways to Handle It | Psychology Today
Here's how to Stop Catastrophizing About Ebola! | Psychology Today Coping Skills, Alternative Medicine, Mental Health Counseling, Healthy Mind, Healthy Living Tips, Healthy Body, Mind Body
Here's How to Stop Catastrophizing About Ebola
Here's how to Stop Catastrophizing About Ebola! | Psychology Today
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What Truly Successful People Know That You Don't
What Truly Successful People Know That You Don't | Psychology Today